Don’t forget the talent on your doorstep

By Ben Brigden

8th February 2017

Eulogy’s weekly meeting is usually a time for sharing good news. The gang assembles to celebrate the week’s successes, championing the work of individuals and – now Dry January is out of the way –toasting the highlights across the consumer, digital and business services teams.

However, at last Friday’s meeting we had the pleasure of welcoming four former Eulogites to join us for a chinwag about how their careers have developed since leaving Eulogy. The stellar panel consisted of Dan Faulks, VP of communications at CNN International, Joe Palmer, COO at Sheffield Wednesday, Dan Thomas, group head of corporate media relations at BT and Melanie Seasons, head of social at OVO Energy.

elumni-event

It was a dynamic discussion which revealed a number of insights into the agency-client relationship. With all four panel members now leading successful careers in-house, they were able to share helpful nuggets from their experiences at Eulogy and in their roles since, which have helped them to carve out their occupations in communications and beyond.

Taking questions from the floor, the panel tackled questions ranging from their views on the importance of traditional media relations and getting the best out of client relationships, to the ever-evolving PR landscape and the differences between in-house and agency roles. There was even time to share the odd tale from the old days of Eulogy (previously spelt with an exclamation mark, apparently!) but I’m relatively new here so I’ll save that topic for another day.

One discussion that really chimed with me was the importance of using contacts to evolve client relationships and enhance career development. In any field, whether in-house or agency side, it’s what you pick up from the people around you that ultimately makes you who you are. And that’s not just limited to your colleagues, who are – of course – vital to personal and collective success, but also your clients, suppliers, and media contacts too. Working in the comms industry gives you access to a patchwork of organisations at strategic and board level, opening up a realm of opportunities for learning about how businesses operate. The ex-Eulogites had clearly used this insight to their advantage and are now reaping the rewards.

As the newest member of the Eulogy gang, it was interesting to hear how our visitors had played their part in Eulogy’s success over the past 20 years, and in doing so evolved their own careers and aspirations. As I embark on my Eulogy journey, I hope to make the most out of the abundance of talent and knowledge available on my doorstep.